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Natural Stone

The wonder of nature’s creation. For millennia, man has been digging up the work of million’s of years of tectonic movement, volcanic activity, and the decay of aquatic animals. From the earliest quarries in Carrara, Italy, to the green hills of Vermont, the quest for natural stone has uncovered a canvas beneath us that tells a story of the earth’s past. The Romans first quarried the hills of Tuscany for marble and that legacy continues to this day.

Because of it’s boundless versatility, natural stone has been used in construction for centuries. While there seem to be countless varieties of natural stone, certain types are well suited to home use. From countertops to wall installations, natural stone can enhance any space with timeless style.

Not just old reliable, there are hundreds of colors available in multiple textures that make this stone a classic choice for any home. Granite is one of the most abundant natural stones on the planet. It forms the bulk of the earth’s crust and is formed under high heat and pressure deep underground. Along with natural abundance, it comes in a large variety of colors. The incredible forces that create granite also cause it to be a very durable stone. It consists of mostly quartz and feldspar which give it a natural strength. It’s a very versatile stone that performs exceptionally well over time with minimal maintenance. Granite is ideal for practically any installation, indoors or out, kitchen or baths. It ranks a 7 on the Mohs scale of hardness.
This metamorphic stone is well known for its use in famous buildings and sculpture around the world. It comes in a variety of colors and patterns, depending on where it’s quarried. Because it’s made of metamorphic limestone, marble is very porous in nature. For this reason, it can be susceptible to staining if not treated and sealed regularly. For the same reasons, it can also etch from coming into contact with acidic foods or liquids. Marble is a much more high-maintenance stone than others, for this reason, we don’t recommend using it in high traffic/high use areas like a kitchen.
A stone that is gaining in popularity, quartzite is composed almost entirely of quartz in various forms. Found around the world, quartzite comes in a wide variety of colors and patterns. Formed under extreme pressure, this stone is remarkably hard and rates from 7-8 on the mohs scale. In addition to hardness, it is also very stain resistant. This makes it ideal for a wide variety of installations.
Travertine is a type of limestone formed by hot springs. The movement of water gives travertine its familiar stripes and the gasses within cause bubbles and holes within the stone, which we call pits. Coloration stays very neutral, beige and gray being the predominate tones. As with Limestone, it’s porous and not suitable for high traffic areas and is subject to staining if not sealed often.
An artistic classic, Onyx is storied material that has been associated with luxury and refinement for centuries. Chemically, it is very similar to marble and is also very soft like marble. Therefore, we do not recommend it’s use in high impact installations like a kitchen. It really shines well in wall installations where it can be backlit for a soft glow.
Composed primarily of talc, soapstone is a very soft material sometimes used for countertops. Color options are limited as it only comes in varying shades of gray. Most slabs are smaller than 7 feet meaning a project is more likely to have seams. Because of its softness, it can easily be scratched. Over time, soapstone will darken. Even though it is soft, Soapstone is non-porous and resistant to staining. Unlike most natural stone countertops, soapstone should never be chemically sealed. Mineral Oil is used to give soapstone its rich finish.